Tag Archive | home garden

This Guy Gave His Girlfriend Kale Thinking It Was Flowers & Twitter Cannot Get Enough Of Him

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It’s not unusual to give your bae a bouquet of roses to show you care, but one guy gave his girlfriend kale thinking it was flowers and his adorable blunder unintentionally won him the Best Boyfriend Award. The mistake is quickly going viral on Twitter and may be the sweetest… and healthiest mix-up to date. If roses are a symbol of love, I wonder what is kale’s romantic meaning?

Houston, Texas couple Jailyn and Jamarcus had been dating for about a year when Jamarcus decided to do something special for his GF. “I was sleeping and he woke me up by knocking on my window. I went to go open the door and he had the lettuce in his hand with a big smile,” Jailyn told Mashable. “I just started laughing so much. After, I hugged and kissed him. He didn’t [know] what it was until I told him it was lettuce. My mom was right by the door and she was laughing, too, but she also thought it was cute.” Since Jamarcus had picked up the vitamin-packed plant from his job at the warehouse, he didn’t realize that it was not a flower. To be fair, the kale is pretty darn purple.

Jailyn decided to share the highly nutritional mistake with the world, tweeting “My boyfriend brought me this thinking it was a flower but it’s lettuce” on May 22, and the cuteness practically broke the internet. In just three days, Jailyn’s post has been retweeted nearly 40,000 times, and has gained over 150,000 “likes.

For More Information: Lily Feinn

Corpse Flowers Near To Blooming

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(CBS) — The smell is back, and this time there are two of them.

The Chicago Botanic Garden is getting ready for rare twin corpse flowers to bloom.

As CBS 2’s Charlie De Mar explains, the awful smell is actually what draws people to them.

Bright, beautiful exotic flowers fill the Botanic Garden in the north suburbs. Right now, the excitement is over these two towering rare flowers.

They are called amorphousness titanium, but they are more commonly known as “corpse flowers.”

The “Titan Twins” Java and Sumatra are named after the Indonesian islands where they’re natively found.

While there’s no firm date on when the twins will bloom, the only guarantee is the awful smell they are known for. It’s been described as anything from a hog farm, to dirty socks to dead fish.

The scent is meant to attract flesh-eating insects that help pollinate.

They have become so popular, a live stream keeps watch for people who want to know when they’ll be ripest.

Outdoor horticulturist Tim Pollack says the garden’s first coprse flower, Spike, never opened in 2015. But two others have bloomed since.

The twin corpse flowers are expected to bloom anywhere from a week, at the earliest, to about 14 days from now. The flowers will remain in bloom for only about a day or two.

For More Information: Charlie De Mar

US flights to cut flower transport cost by half

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The Kenya Flower Council (KFC) projects that the freight cost for flower exports to the US will halve with direct flights between the two countries.

Cargo flights are currently charging Sh400 ($4) per kilogram me of flowers shipped to America via Amsterdam or South Africa. KFC says the charges are high because of the transit stopover.

“It is going to be cheaper for us to export our flowers to the US once direct flights to America start, this will be a big boost to our growers who will see their earnings improve,” said chief executive officer Jane Ngigi.

The council is gathering market intelligence on the status of the American market, entry points and investment opportunities.

Volumes of flowers exports last year grew incrementally to 133,000 tonnes from 130,000 tonnes the previous year, according to data from the Horticulture Development Centre.

Ms Ngige said the US market would raise competition for Kenyan flowers globally as currently nearly all the produce from the country is sold in Europe.

“Exports to the US implies we will have diversified our markets and we will no longer have to rely on Europe as our major buyer; this will make our produce competitive because of an alternative market,” she said.

Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA) was this year granted Category One status by American authorities, enabling direct flights from Nairobi expected to start in the next few months.

Dick Van Ramsdonk, president of HPP Exhibitions, said Kenyan flowers are gaining popularity in the US but remain costly to transport.

“Kenya’s flowers are a sensation in the US but until the categorization, it has been costly and lengthy to ship the country’s flowers to the world’s biggest market of our flower after the EU,” said Mr Raimondo.

He said with the flights, more American buyers will be coming to Nairobi next month during the sixth edition of the International Flower Trade Expo, noting that they have received a lot of confirmations and increasing inquiries from.

For More Information:- GERALD ANDAE

Cut flowers (almost) for free

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Nothing brightens up a room or makes a more personal gift than a bunch of fresh flowers. They can be costly, though – I mean really costly, both financially and environmentally. Small arrangements can easily sell from £25 (and up) from a good quality florist. Sadly, the pesticides – often used in greater amounts than on edible crops – and transport miles involved in creating these displays can be considerable, too. Dictated by the demands of the global cut-flower industry, much of this material, despite being 3D-printer perfect in appearance is also boringly uniform. With stems so straight and petals so flawless, they are indistinguishable from plastic, and smell just about as fragrant.

But if you get your species choice right, cut flowers can be among the easiest of all crops to grow. Capable of coming back year after year from just a single purchase of seed, they are far cheaper, too, some arguably free. They will have a stronger scent and longer vase life to boot. It really is win-win all round. Even if you have the smallest plot, there are options to give you months of colour and fragrance. Here are a bunch I am sowing and planting right now…

Sweet peas will offer up months of floral harvests if you keep picking them regularly. Now is still a good time to sow them up north, but if you are in the south pots of seedlings can be picked up at very reasonable prices from garden centres everywhere.

If it’s nose appeal you are after, be sure to check for the word “scented” or “fragrant” on the packet, as not all varieties are scented. My favourite rose breeder, David Austin, has created an astonishing array of varieties far more delicate and olde-worlde looking than any “Dulux-coloured” types sold in supermarkets, all of which are selected for gorgeous scent.

Lavender is easy to propagate from seeds and cuttings and will produce dozens of fragrant flower heads per plant every summer.

In late summer, you can’t beat the blouse, bang-on-trend blooms of dahlias that will churn out a continuous flow of flowers right up to the first frosts. If you pot up a packet of tubers right now, the new growth can be used to make fast-growing cuttings, giving you loads of plants for free. A similar deal is the case with microcosmic that will form a growing clump if left to their own devices, providing more and more flowers each year. Both these blooms have an excellent vase life, lasting well over a week indoors.

For More Information:- James Wong

Zinnias a top flower for nectar, color and cut flowers

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Zinnias are the top flower for the San Antonio summer garden. They prosper in the heat and full sun to produce colorful blooms from April 1 to Thanksgiving. Bloom colors include red, yellow, cream, orange, lavender, pink, gold, bicolor and even green. There are a number of different zinnia species on the market and a large selection of hybrids.

Although they are heat tolerant, zinnias are not xeriscape plants. They do best if they are irrigated twice a week all summer with drip irrigation. The other main cultural challenge is powdery mildew. A selling point for hybrids on the retail market is that they are more resistant to mildew than the old fashioned zinnias like California Giant.

The most common zinnia sold at area nurseries is the hybrid Dreamland. It grows to about 16 inches tall and has a tightly packed, mound-shaped 5-inch bloom with bright colors. Lilliput is a small zinnia (8 inches tall) that has a 2-inch bloom.

The old-fashioned varieties, California Giant and Cactus are grown easily from seed to reach 3 feet tall. Some of the dahlia flowered mixes are even taller. All are of the species, Zinnia elegens.

Zinnia angustifolia var. linearis is a sprawling, small-flowered zinnia available in yellow, gold and white that is drought tolerant and mildew resistant.

Profusion is a medium-size zinnia that produces more colors and larger blooms than linearis. The variety is a Z. elegens-Z. angustifolia cross which is less susceptible to mildew and more drought tolerant than the Z. elegens varieties.

Each year new colors of Profusion zinnias are available on the market. This year Peterson Brothers wholesale nursery reports that the new color is a red.

Zinnias are a favorite summer annual for a number of reasons beyond the showy blooms.

For More Information:- Calvin Finch

Blue and yellow flowers are a classic colour combination

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A perennial type of veronica, Veronica Mongolian boasts alluring spikes of flowers that are so loved by bees and insects. Perennial veronica aren’t native but were once popular cottage garden plants. Those elegant spires contrast perfectly with the round balls of repeat-flowering roses such as Rosa ‘Absolutely Fabulous’ and if you deadhead them promptly in summer they produce a lovely late flush of blue.

Opposite on the colour wheel, yellow and blue always make each other sing when placed together.

While yellow is forthright and warm and pushes forward, cool blues pull back – drawing the eye deeper into a scene. It’s a ting-and-yang, sweet-sour sort of set-up – opposites creating tension and excitement for the eye.

Yellows are still easy to find in the April garden – mainly from within the daisy family, which are so generous in their flowering. So don’t be snobby about this cheerful colour; go out and grab a pot or two of gold

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Two plants that give generously a second time are pale blue Campanula lactiflora and dark spires of Salvia nemerosa ‘Caradonna‘. After the first flowers have faded, trim off the spent bits and leave the leafy stalks below, which will quickly make side shoots. Both need good staking to keep them from toppling over.

For More Information:- NEIL ROSS

Congressman Abraham honors men for decades of agriculture work

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Congressman Ralph Abraham, M.D., R-Alto, honored two residents of Louisiana‘s 5th Congressional District for their recent induction into the Louisiana Agriculture Hall of Distinction with a speech on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives on Monday, March 20.

Dr. Abraham recognized Ray Young of Wisner and Charles “Buck” Understand of Alexandria for their decades of work contributing to the success of farming and forestry in Louisiana. Both were inducted into the hall of distinction earlier this month.

A transcript of Dr. Abraham’s comments can be found below:

“Mr. Speaker,

“I rise today to recognize two of my constituents, Ray Young of Wisner and Charles ‘Buck’ Understand of Alexandria, for their recent induction into the Louisiana Agriculture Hall of Distinction.
Since growing up on his family farm, Ray Young has dedicated his life and career to farming.

“After earning a degree in Agriculture from Louisiana Tech and a Masters in Entomology from LSU, Ray went on to pioneer the ‘Stale Seed Bed Conservation Tillage System,’ known today as no-till and used across the South to enhance crop production.

“In 1989, Ray presented to Congress an application to charter the Federal Land Bank of North Louisiana. He has served on the board of directors for the Federal Land Bank, as the Board Chairman of the Louisiana Land Bank, and as a leader of numerous state and federal agricultural organizations.

“Ray and his family still farm cotton, soybeans, sweet potatoes, Irish potatoes, corn, vegetables, cattle, hay, wheat and pine trees. He is a tremendous example of a Louisiana farmer making a life and a living off his land, and his insight is always valuable to me when I’m working on agriculture policy for our nation.

Buck Understand has spent 34 years presiding over the 4,000-plus members of the Louisiana Forestry Association, a past president of the Southern Forest Heritage Museum, and a past president of the National Council of Forestry Executives.

“During that time, Buck has helped pass the Forest Productivity Program to get part of the state’s severance taxes distributed to forest landowners as cost-share for replanting. It’s recognized as one of the top programs in the nation.

“He’s been instrumental in advancing forestry education at the Technical School and University levels so that we can have sustainable and productive working forests.

“Buck continues to serve the forestry industry today, and I look forward to working with him in my role on the Working Forest Caucus on behalf of foresters across our country.

“Mr. Speaker, Louisiana is one of the top agriculture states in the nation, and I am proud to serve on the Agriculture Committee here in Washington to represent our state’s farmers, foresters and ranchers.
But the real contributions to our state’s agricultural prowess can be traced back to folks like Ray Young and Buck Vandersteen, men who have spent their lives enhancing the industry that is so vital to Louisiana.

For more Information:- WASHINGTON D.C